Luafication (+ tutorial)

Norah has been growing strongly in the past months, and desperately needs some new clothes for the coming Winter. So I set out to make some quick dresses for her: just a pretty fabric, and a super simple bodice + gathered skirt design. No pleating, no peter pan collars, no sleeves, no experiments, no nothing.

That was the plan. As I was going through my stash, however, new ideas quickly started bubbling up, and before I knew it, I got carried away by another experiment.

The idea came when I saw the Atelier Brunette fabrics I had been eagerly waiting to make something with. I won them this Summer in a give-away by the splendid Belgian fabric shop Liesellove. I’m the type of person who hardly ever enters give-aways “because I never win anyway”. So I was over the moon when Lies mailed me that I won shop credit to spend at Liesellove. Picking fabrics wasn’t easy – Liesellove carries so many pretty fabrics – but eventually I picked three Atelier Brunette fabrics. And I haven’t regretted it. Gorgeous prints, great quality, and as finely woven as voile.

I have a soft spot for the combination of (dark) yellow and black & white prints, so I knew I wanted to combine Bye Bye Birdie and Hirondelle in one dress. And that brings me back to my experiment.  I wanted to luafy the dress bodice.

Luafytransitive verb \ˈlü-ə-ˌfī\  v.  to include the shape of the piping detail of the Lua sleepsack into another sewing project.

In the back, I opted for a different shape. Just adding a little hunchback of Notre Dame touch.


Luafication is really easy! You start from a basic bodice pattern and then you… Well, let’s turn this into a little tutorial, shall we?


TUTORIAL

1. Draw a scallop shape on your front bodice pattern piece. Make sure that the beginning and end of the scallop are perpendicular to the fold – otherwise, you will end up with a pointy shape. 
Note: for a perfectly symmetrical shape, fold the pattern piece in half (excl. the seam allowance) and draw half a scallop.


2. Cut the line you just drew.

3. Put the pattern pieces on the fabrics, and add seam allowance to the new edges as you cut.

4. Now you can stitch the top and bottom parts with right sides together. Notch the seam allowance in the curve parts, and press it towards the darkest of the two fabrics. Finish the dress as you normally would.

Thank you, Lies, for the lovely fabrics!


Fabrics: Atelier Brunette
Dress pattern: adapted Hanami

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24 thoughts on “Luafication (+ tutorial)

  1. Ha, that was also my first thought when I saw the pictures: so tall! She's average in terms of height, so I guess she looks taller because she's so thin. Either that, or the Hanami is a super flattering pattern ;-p

  2. Brilliant! I'm going to go full loop and incorporate this back into the Lua! I'm planning one for a one year old and realised that I don't have enough of the fabric I wanted to use. My solution was to make a top bit for the back as well, only without piping, as I was worried that the child would feel that through the batting, princess and the pea-style. I was wondering how to make the back look like it is supposed to be there, I think you've solved this for me. Thanks!

  3. And it is Hanami again! The best pattern ever. I have pleated it ruffled it and now I can luafy it. I just hope my daughter doesn't grow too fast. She is 8 already, but thin enough to wear six.

  4. So pretty! I love the combination of fabrics you've used here. I must try out the Lua pattern soon as a gift for new babies – the Hanami is already a favourite.

  5. Zo leuk! Een 'simpele' manier om van een basic jurkje iets specialer te maken! Dat ga ik onthouden! En dat doet me er aan denken dat ik het Lua patroon nog moet aanschaffen!

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